Course Syllabus

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2017 Syllabus  – Click for a printable PDF version of the course syllabus.

Our Mission:

To cultivate awareness, understanding, and Stewardship of the Wenatchee River region by Developing an active corps of well-informed Community volunteers.

 After completing the course, you will be able to…

Goal I: Foundational Knowledge

  • … describe the role geology plays in the Wenatchee River watershed.
  • … locate rivers, mountain ranges, and lakes within the Wenatchee River watershed.
  • … identify the basic organization and components of a plant and be able to describe characteristics of 8 or more plant families.
  • … identify the parts of an insect and the basic structure of several insect orders.
  • … understand basic anatomy, physiology, and topography of birds.
  • … describe the characteristics of native mammals, reptiles and amphibians.
  • … describe the components of shrub-steppe, montane, and riparian ecosystems.
  • … identify 100 common plant and animal species by name, including trees, shrubs, wildflowers, mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and insects.

 Goal II: Field ID Skills

  • … be comfortable using field guides and dichotomous keys to make identifications.
  • … identify conifers of the Eastside Cascade Mountains.
  • … identify common shrubs based on physical features.
  • … classify common wildflowers to the family level.
  • … identify common Washington birds by sight.
  • … identify common Washington mammals, reptiles, and amphibians by their physical features.
  • … identify common Washington insect orders.

Goal III: Field Journaling Skills

  • … maintain a record of observations in a field journal.
  • … use field sketching and note-taking to sharpen observation skills.

Goal III: Sense of Place Practices

  • … spend time in the close investigation of local field sites.
  • … volunteer with a local organization doing conservation work.
  • … connect the knowledge, skill, and experience gained to the local landscape.

Class meets in Batjer Hall, Room 8039

Suggested orientation to prepare for the 12-week course

Heads up: you’ll be using a class websitehttp://www.wenatcheenaturalist.com/

For each week of class, the focus topic can be found under TOPICS/RESOURCES.  Each week’s topic contains resources to supplement the in-class presentations and activities.   Prior to each class, you will receive an email containing the syllabus’ suggested pre-work options, with clickable internet links.

 

Prior to our first class, review a few background resources included on the Wenatchee Naturalist website, TOPICS/RESOURCES Tab, specifically: 

Eastside Ecosystems Overview at http://www.wenatcheenaturalist.com/east-side-ecosystems/

Field Observation Skills at http://www.wenatcheenaturalist.com/east-side-ecosystems/field-observation-skills/

 

Suggested note-taking method:  You will be provided with a field journal at our first class

  • I suggest taking all class and field notes directly into your journal (provided at class), creating a portable reference you’ll have with you when you do your field observations.
  • An option is to bring your laptop or tablet to class and follow along electronically.

 

Select a field site to visit weekly for 30+ minutes. Try to visit this site before week 2.

Prepare to briefly “introduce” your site to others at our third class meeting.  A detailed field site selection instructions is  here and will be introduced during our second class.

 

Supplies to bring weekly to use in class and in the field: 

  • Writing pen and pencil
  • Drawing Pen: waterproof, fade proof, acid free, black, micro point
  • Loaned hand lens
  • Optional: colored pencils, watercolor pencils, watercolor paints.  You will see examples at Class #1
  • Digital camera, tablet, or smart phone

 

Logistics:

  1. How to find our classroom.  We are in the single-story Batjer Hall, directly north of the campus fountain.  The entrance facing the fountain doesn’t connect to our classroom, so plan to enter the building on the east side (next to the library).  Find the very long center hallway and walk all the way to the north end.  Alternatively, enter from the north end of the building- within sight of the campus raised bed gardens.  This door has a native plant garden on either side of the door.  Our classroom is immediately inside the north entrance.  Click here for a campus map.
  2. Food and drinks:  We will have a refreshments table in the hall with hot drinks and light snacks.  Feel free to bring a sack dinner.
  3. Parking. WVC parking lots are patrolled at night and tickets are issued if you don’t have a parking pass.  Free parallel street parking is available on 9th Street. Consider purchasing a fall evening parking pass ($15), available on the main floor of Wenatchi Hall at the Registrar. Detailed information here.


 

Sept. 27, 2017 Week 1: Field Observation Skills Development       

Guest Wildlife Biologist and Artist:  Heather A. Wallis Murphy

5:30-6:00     Students gather and check out Loaner Boxes, fill out paperwork

6:00-6:15     Welcome, orientation, and Course Overview

6:15-7:15     Nature Journaling Drawing workshop

7:15-7:25     Break – complete Loaner Box Check out

7:25-8:20     Field Trip organization and Field Journaling Drawing workshop, continued

8:20-8:30     Introduce Learn 10! Species 1-10* The website’s LEARN 10 TAB

 

*Learn 10 – Each week, 10 images of native plants and animals will be shown in rapid progression as class members first write and then call out the species name. The website’s LEARN 10 TAB contains all 100 focus species for the class. Additional ways to practice at home include using an on-line flashcard games at Quizlet.

Your Field Site journaling focus for the coming week:  Observe, draw, and describe what you noticed during our first field trip, trying out several drawing techniques presented in the workshop. Find several shrubs and sketch life-sized leaves, under Heather Murphy’s guidance.

 

Sat. Sept. 30, 2017   Field Trip 1:  White River riparian exploration

Logistics letter provided in class, via email, and on website

Guest scientist/artist field trip leader:  Heather A. Wallis Murphy

Featured organizations: Tall Timber’s Conservation Easement with CDLT

Citizen Science Projects:  Upper Basin Birders & eBird

 

Suggested Reading prior to class       if you only have time to look at one item, do BOLDED

Review Wenatchee Naturalist website TOPICS/RESOURCES : Deciduous Shrubs and Trees TAB Including:

  • Articles by Susan Ballinger about shrub identification &the importance of our shrubby canyons as habitat

 

  • Gestures of Stone and Water: A Natural History of the Wenatchee Watershed, by Tim McNulty. Pg. 31-36, Images of the Watershed (2002). (LOANED BOOK)

 

  • Cascade-Olympic Natural History: A Trailside Reference (2nd edition, 1999), by Daniel Mathews. Read Chapter 1, Chapter 16, and Appendix “Five-Kingdom Taxonomy.” (LOANED BOOK)

 

  • Washington Wildlife by Woodland Park Zoo (61 pages). Use this as general background reading throughout the course. Find this document both in hardcopy (LOANED BOOKLET) and linked on Wenatchee Naturalist website. (CLASS WEBSITE)

 

  • Field Guide: Plants of Southern Interior British Columbia and the Inland Northwest, edited by Roberta Parish, Ray Coupe, and Dennis Lloyd (1996). Skim introduction, focus on habitat descriptions. (LOANED BOOK)

 

Oct. 4, 2017  Week  2:  Wenatchee River Watershed overview

5:30-6:00     Students gather, review resource table, apply water-proofing tape to your journal.

6:00-6:10:   Featured conservation organization: TBA

6:10-6:15     Quick review of last week and overview of today’s class

6:15-6:35     In small groups, describe pre-selected field site; introduce one-another. All-group introductions

6:35-7:00     Geography of the Wenatchee watershed – rotation lab activity

7:00-7:10     Break

7:10-7:30     Introduction to Wenatchee Watershed Ecosystems

7:30-8:15     Lab using fresh samples: “Learn 10” Common Shrubs and Deciduous Trees, including 2-minute             journal skills practice

8:15-8:30     Learn 10!  Species 1-10   Practice using the website’s LEARN 10 TAB

 

Field site journaling focus for the coming week: Hand-draw a map of your site placing North at the top of your page. Record the elevation of lowest and highest point (use Google maps). Label each habitat type and all water bodies. Draw your walking route and label any points where you plan to stop to make observations. Record the distance traveled. Include structures and roads.

 

Suggested Reading prior to class:    If you only have time to look at one item, do BOLDED               

Review Wenatchee Naturalist website TOPICS/RESOURCES : Conifers

 

 

  • Cascade-Olympic Natural History: A Trailside Reference by Daniel Mathews. Skim Chapter 3 to see what a native conifer identification field guide is like. (LOANED BOOK)

 

  • View locally-produced DVD  “The Dry Forest: Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest” (LOANED DVD)

 

  • View locally-produced DVD  “Fire Lookouts-A National Treasure” (LOANED DVD)

 

  • How A Tree Grows, USFS FS-32 an illustrated guide to tree structures & functions. (LOANED BOOKLET)

 

 

 

 

Oct. 11, 2017 Week 3:  Dry Forest Ecology & Conifers                   

5:30-6:00     Students gather and review resource table; journal-sharing with one-another and Susan

6:00-6:10     Featured conservation organization:  TBA

6:10-6:15     Quick review of last week and overview of today’s class

6:15-7:00     Eastside Fire Ecology and our conifers – PowerPoint-Susan Ballinger.

7:00-8:20     Learn 10 conifers:  a lab using cones, needles, bark, photos, field guides and a key, including 2-minute journal skills practice.

8:20-8:30     Learn 10! Species 1-20 Practice using the website’s LEARN 10 TAB

 

Your Field Site journaling focus for the coming week: Observe, draw, and describe 2-3 conifer trees.  Include details of each tree’s habitat, oversize & shape and bark. Describe any evidence of disease or evidence of feeding by an animal, or of injury from wildfire.

 

Sat. Oct. 14, 2017     Field Trip 2:  Entiat River Riparian Exploration                

Logistics letter provided in class, via email, and on website

Guest scientist leaders: Aquatic Ecologist, Dr. Mark Oswood.

Featured organizations:  Columbia Breaks Fire Interpretive Center

 

Suggested Reading prior to class:    If you only have time to look at one item, do BOLDED

 

Review Wenatchee Naturalist website TOPICS/RESOURCES : Riparian, Wetland, and Aquatic Ecosystems

ü  An article about riparian habitats by Susan Ballinger, Neotropical Migrants Raising Their Young in Our Canyons

ü  An article about the fun of exploring local river riparian habitats by Susan Ballinger,  Head to the River for Fun in the Mud!

 Loaner box suggested reading:

 

ü  At Home with Wetlands: A Landowners Guide by WA Department of Ecology. An approachable and well-written overview of wetland types, values, and human issues. (LOANED BOOK)

 

·      Washington Wildlife by Woodland Park Zoo, Wetland Habitats (pg. 41-51). (LOANED BOOKLET & Website)

 

·      Cascade-Olympic Natural History: A Trailside Reference by Daniel Mathews. Skim Chapter 3 to see what a native fish identification field guide is like. (LOANED BOOK)

 

Oct. 18, 2017 Week 4: Riparian & Aquatic Ecosystems 

       Guest Aquatic Ecologist: Dr. Mark Oswood              

5:30-6:00     Students gather and review resource table; journal-sharing with one-another and Susan

6:00-6:10     Featured conservation organization: TBA

6:10-6:15     Quick review of last week and overview of today’s class

6:15-6:30     Pictorial review of our Entiat River field trip to Stormy Preserve’s Riparian corridor.

6:30-7:00     Introduction to Aquatic Ecology and Macroinvertebrates, Dr. Mark Oswood

7:00-7:10     break

7:10-7:30     Dr. Mark Oswood’s presentation, continued

7:30-8:20     Lab using fresh samples: “Learn 10” Common Shrubs and Deciduous Trees, including 2-minute journal skills practice.

8:30                 Learn 10!  Species 1-30 Practice using the website’s LEARN 10 TAB

 

Your Field Site journaling focus for the coming week: Observe, draw, and describe 2-3 deciduous trees or shrubs. Include details of each shrub’s habitat, oversize & shape and bark. Describe any evidence of disease or evidence of feeding by an animal.

 

Suggested Reading prior to class:    If you only have time to look at one item, do BOLDED

 

Review Wenatchee Naturalist website TOPICS/RESOURCES : INSECTS: Terrestrial and Aquatic , including:

 

 

  • Cascade-Olympic Natural History: A Trailside Reference by Daniel Mathews. Skim Chapter 13 to see an example of what insect field identification guides are like. (LOANED BOOK)

Oct. 25, 2017 Week 5: Terrestrial Insects                

Guest Entomologist: Dr. Bob Gillespie

5:30-6:00     Students gather and review resource table; journal-sharing  with one-another and Susan

6:00-6:10     Featured conservation organization: TBA

6:10-6:15     Quick review of last week and overview of today’s class

6:15-7:00     Introduction to Shrub-steppe Insect Biodiversity PowerPoint

7:00-7:10     5-minute small group journal share, then break.

7:10-7:20     Citizen Science Organization:  Xerces Society

7:20-8:20     Insect lab journaling activity- ok to bring your camera.  Will include 2-minute journal skills practice

8:20-8:30     Learn 10! Species 1-40   Practice using the website’s LEARN 10 TAB

 

Your Field Site journaling focus for the coming week:  For 1-3 insects, observe, draw, and record observed behavior, habitat, and population levels. Attempt to classify into an insect Order, using class notes. It is ok to take a collecting container to your site and to temporarily capture an insect in order to better observe it in the field, and then release it on site.

 

 

 

Suggested Reading prior to class:    If you only have time to look at one item, do BOLDED

 

Review Wenatchee Naturalist website TOPICS/RESOURCESMammals

 

 

Cascade-Olympic Natural History: A Trailside Reference by Daniel Mathews. Skim Chapter 8 to see what a native mammal identification field guide is like. (LOANED BOOK)

 

Cascade-Olympic Natural History: A Trailside Reference by Daniel Mathews. Skim Chpt. 2. (LOANED BOOK)

 

Woodland Park Zoo Teacher Resources  PowerPoint Mammal Diversity   Overview of mammal characteristics.

 

Nov. 1, 2017 Week 6:  Mammals   Location:  Wenatchi Hall, 3rd Floor, Room 2305             

Guest Speaker: TBA, Wildlife Biologist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

5:30-6:00     Students gather and review resource table;  journal-sharing  with one-another and Susan

NOTE:  no food or drink allowed in the study skin lab.

6:00-6:05     Quick review of last week and overview of today’s class

6:05-6:35     http://hugefloods.com/2-Minute-Geology.htmlIntroduction of Chelan County mammals

6:35-7:05     Explore 20 of the “Learn 10” mammals and create your own field guide notes by exploring the skulls, study skins, and illustrated lab guides. Guided questions provided.

7:05-7:15     Break

7:15-8:20     Continue lab, including 2-minute journal skills practice activity.

8:20-8:30     Learn 10!   Species 1-50 Practice using the website’s LEARN 10 TAB

 

Your field site journaling focus for the coming week:  Seek out and describe signs of mammal presence. Can include evidence of herbivory or predation, tracks, scat, habitat for cover, or presence of food resources.

 

Suggested Reading prior to class:    If you only have time to look at one item, do BOLDED         

Review Wenatchee Naturalist website TOPICS/RESOURCES: Geology  and  Shrub-steppe Ecosystems

ü 2-minute geologyhttp://hugefloods.com/2-Minute-Geology.html  CWU geology professor, Nick Zinter, has created a 12-part series of in-the-field 2-minute geology videos. Start with the “Wenatchee Valley” and view them all!

ü Article by Susan Ballinger, Shrub-steppe Plant Adaptations

ü Article by Susan Ballinger, Wildfires Affect on Local Landscape.

ü Article by Susan Ballinger, In Appreciation of Sagebrush

ü Article by Susan Ballinger:  The Amazing Tale of Sagebrush galls.

 

Loaner Box suggested reading:

ü  Washington Watchable Wildflowers:  A Columbia Basin Guide by B.L.M. (pg. 5-14). (LOANED BOOK, also PDF on CLASS WEBSITE)

·    Cascade-Olympic Natural History: A Trailside Reference by Daniel Mathews. Skim Chapter 15 to see what a geology field guide is like. (LOANED BOOK)

·    Washington Wildlife by Woodland Park Zoo, Steppe Habitats (pg. 3-8). Use this as general background reading, providing a big picture overview. (LOANDED BOOKLET and WEBSITE)

·    NOXIOUS WEEDS booklet & WEED INVASION!  USFS Newspaper (LOANED ) Colorful introductions to our local noxious weeds

 

Nov. 8, 2017 Week 7:  Geology and Shrub-steppe Ecology and Shrubs  

Guest geologist, Kelsay Stanton    

5:30-6:00     Students gather and review resource table;  journal-sharing  with one-another and Susan

6:00-6:10     Featured conservation organization: TBA

6:10-6:15     Quick review of last week and overview of today’s class

6:15-7:00     Geology of the Wenatchee Valley- geologist Kelsay Stanton

7:00-7:15     5-minute small group field site journal share, then break.  Finalize field trip car-pooling

7:20-8:20     Shrub-steppe Plant Ecology and Wildfires, Lecture and lab using herbarium sheets and samples

8:20-8:30     Learn 10!   Species 1-60 Practice using the website’s LEARN 10 TAB

 

Your Field Site journaling focus for the coming week:  Draw a geologic feature visible at your site.  Describe the soil texture, color, and depth.  Describe three dominant plants at your site, and sketch their growth forms.

 

Sat. Nov. 11, 2017 Field Trip 3: Wenatchee River Valley exploration             

Logistics letter provided in class, via email, and on website

Guest geologist field trip leader:  Kelsay Stanton

Featured Organizations:  Wenatchee River Institute

Citizen Science Projects:  CDLT ebird routes

Suggested Reading prior to class:    If you only have time to look at one item, do BOLDED        

Review Wenatchee Naturalist website TOPICS/RESOURCES :  Reptiles & Amphibians, including:

  • Article by Susan Ballinger, August Field Notes: A Month of Reptile Sightings.
  • California Herps: A Guide to the Amphibians & Reptiles of CA:  includes photo galleries, range maps, species account, &  sound recordings http://www.californiaherps.com/

 

 

Loaner Box suggested readings:

  • Washington Wildlife by Woodland Park Zoo, Amphibians & Reptiles (pg. 9, 19-20, 48-49). Use this as general background reading, providing a big picture overview. (LOANED BOOKLET &link on WEBSITE)

 

 

  • Cascade-Olympic Natural History: A Trailside Reference by Daniel Mathews. Skim Chapters 10-11 to see what a native reptiles and amphibian identification field guide is like. (LOANED BOOK)

 

 

Nov. 15, 2017 Week 8:   Reptiles & Amphibians   

Location: Wenatchi Hall, 3rd floor, Room 2305

Guest Wildlife Biologist: Neal Hedges, CDLT Stewardship Director

5:30-6:00     Students gather and review resource table;  journal-sharing  with one-another and Susan

6:00-6:10     Featured conservation organization:  TBA

6:10-6:15     Quick review of last week and overview of today’s class

6:15-7:05     Reptile and Amphibians of the Eastside Cascade Mountains: biodiversity and conservation concerns- guest speaker wildlife biologist, Neal Hedges.

7:05-7:10     break

7:10-7:30     Lab activity: Field Journaling Drawing Techniques applied practice

7:30-8:10     Using a key and field guides to identify reptiles & amphibians. Rotation stations set up with specimens, photos, field guides, a species list, and guiding questions. Will include 2-minute skills practice activity.

8:10-8:20     Small group sharing:  personal field site visit reports

8:20-8:30     Learn 10!  Species 1-70 Practice using the website’s LEARN 10 TAB

 

Your field site journaling focus for the coming week: Seek out and describe a potential habitat and possible food item for either a reptile or an amphibian.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, Nov. 19, 2017 – Annual all-Wenatchee Naturalist volunteer recognition social, held at the Wenatchee Chelan PUD Auditorium.  Details provided in class.   OPTIONAL

 

No Class during Thanksgiving Week!

 

Suggested Reading prior to class:    If you only have time to look at one item, do BOLDED                                                                   

 

  • Birds of Yakima River Canyon, Wenatchee Resource Area, BLM as an introduction to the diversity of birds found in the Wenatchee Watershed. (LOANED BOOK)

 

 

 

 

Nov. 29, 2017 Week 9:  Birds Part 1     

5:30-6:00     Students gather and review resource table; journal-sharing  with one-another and Susan

6:00-6:10     Featured conservation organization:  TBA

6:10-6:15     Quick review of last week and overview of today’s class

6:15-7:00     Combined lecture and activities- Introduction to Bird Identification

7:00-7:10     break

7:10-8:20     Rotation lab:  Practice apply skills using field guides and life-sized model birds

8:20-8:30     Learn 10!  Species 1-80 Practice using the website’s LEARN 10 TAB

      

Your field site journaling focus for the coming week: Observe and describe 1-3 birds using your field site.  Describe the behavior, location, and physical features of each bird. Use a drawing technique to sketch one bird.

 

Suggested Reading prior to class:    If you only have time to look at one item, do Ö                                                                      

Review Wenatchee Naturalist website TOPICS/RESOURCES : Birds

  • Read the Introduction in Sibley’s Field Guide to Western Birds or the Introduction in Birds of the Inland Northwest (LOANED BOOK)

 

  • Download free from Apple and Android app store- Merlin Bird ID app http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/

 

  • Washington Wildlife by Woodland Park Zoo, Birds (pg. 10-11; 20, 34-35, 49-50). Use this as general background reading, providing a big picture overview. (Website and Loaner Box)

 

 

 

  • 11×17” poster: Sibley’s Backyard Birds (LOANED POSTER)

 

Sat. Dec. 2. 19, 2017  Half-day Field Trip 4: Winter birding along the Columbia River Guest field trip leader, Jenny Graevell, NCWAS Board member

Featured Organizations:  Wenatchee Row and Paddle Club

Citizen Science Projects:  WDFW-State Audubon Shrub-steppe Bird survey project

 

Dec. 6, 2017 Week 10:  Birds Part 2    Location:  Wenatchi Hall, 3rd Floor, Room 2305                               

5:30-6:00     Students gather and review resource table; journal-sharing  with one-another and Susan

6:00-6:10     Featured conservation organization:   TBA

6:10-6:15     Quick review of last week and overview of today’s class

6:15-6:30    Introduction to bird biology Presentation

6:30-7:00     Bird study skin rotation lab, focusing on our 20 “Learn 10” species, using specimens, notes, and handouts. Guiding questions at each lab station invite students to make measurements and take notes. At each station, pairs of study skins and an accompanying key ID tip sheet will guide student inquiry.

7:00-7:15     5-minute small group field site journal share, then break.

7:15-8:20     Continued:  Field Journaling Drawing Techniques applied practice Study skin rotation lab with guided field notes.

8:20-8:30     Learn 10! Species 1-90  Practice using the website’s LEARN 10 TAB

Your Field Site journaling focus for the coming week:  Quickly draw 1-3 birds, using the blind contour drawing technique.  Take descriptive notes on body shape, color pattern, beak and head shape, behavior, and use of habitat elements.

 

Suggested Reading prior to class:    If you only have time to look at one item, do BOLDED

Review Wenatchee Naturalist website TOPICS/RESOURCES : Wildflowers & Grasses

 

 

  • A great easy-to-use approach to learning the key characteristics for 8 common wildflower plant families: mustard, mint, parsley, pea, lily, mallow, and aster. We’ll use these playing cards in class Learning to Identify Plants by Family  text and illustrations, or a 45-minute video tutorial to the Patterns Method with the Botany in a Day author Thomas Elpel (INTERNET)

 

  • Cascade-Olympic Natural History: A Trailside Reference by Daniel Mathews. Skim Chapter 4 to see what a native wildflower identification field guide is like. (LOANED BOOK)

 

  • A Botanical Primer: A Systematic Introduction to Vascular Plant Identification by Joseph Arnett.  Read pages 2-12 and 21-23. (LOANED BOOK)

 

  • Field Guide: Plants of Southern Interior British Columbia and the Inland Northwest , edited by Roberta Parish, Ray Coupe, and Dennis Lloyd (1996). (LOANED  BOOK)

 

 

 

Dec. 13, 2017 Week 11:  Wildflowers                                                 

5:30-6:00     Students gather and review resource table; journal-sharing with one-another and Susan

6:00-6:10     Featured conservation organization: TBA

6:10-6:15     Quick review of last week and overview of today’s class

6:15-7:00     Introduction Lecture & Lab:  Characteristics of a flower with dissections, common plant families and methods of species identification.

7:00-7:15     5-minute small group field site journal share, then break.

7:15-8:20     Lecture & Lab Exploring plant parts and features of 8 plant families, including 2-minute journal skills practice activity.

8:20-8:30     Learn 10!  Species 1- 100 practice for final game next week using the website’s LEARN 10 TAB

 

Your Field Site journaling focus for the coming week: Prepare your presentation!

 

Dec. 20, 2017 Week 12: Next steps: Being a Wenatchee Naturalist

5:30-6:00     Return checked-out materials and complete course evaluations.

6:00-6:10     Set-up potluck and field journal display.

6:10-6:40     Potluck Dinner and journal viewing.

6:40-7:00     Grand finale Learn 10- All 100 species game with prizes and dessert.

7:00-8:30     Student presentations.  Learn about future opportunities for Wenatchee Naturalists